REXUS

REXUS

REXUS stands for "Rocket Experiments for University Students", and the program is considered as an annual sounding rocket program launched from the Esrange Space Center.

The REXUS and BEXUS programs offer opportunities for student experiments to be flown on sounding rockets and stratospheric balloons.
Each flight will carry a payload consisting solely of student experiments. Half the payload is available to German students through a DLR Announcement of Opportunity and the other half is made available to students from all other ESA Member States and Co-operating States by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) through a collaboration with ESA.

REXUS is an unguided, spin-stabilised, solid-propellant, single stage rocket. The vehicle has a length of 5.6 m and a diameter of 35.6 cm and the total available mass for student experiments is about 30 kg.

The REXUS program is a joint project between the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) and the Mobile Rocket Base (Moraba) of the German Aerospace Center DLR. The campaign is conducted by EuroLaunch* in close cooperation with the students.

Read more about Rexus and Bexus:
REXUS BEXUS - Rocket and Balloon Experiments for University Students

Student web pages
Rexus IV

REXUS 3

REXUS

Campaign information Rexus 3 (2006)

GENERAL INFORMATION

Launch site: Esrange Space Center
Launch date: April 5, 2006
Customer: The REXUS program is a joint project between the Swedish Space Corporation SSC, ESRANGE, and the Mobile Rocket Base (Moraba) of the German Aerospace Center DLR, conducted by newly founded EUROLAUNCH. The scientific payload capacity is shared between Swedish and German student experimenters. REXUS is considered as an annual sounding rocket program, launched from ESRANGE, Sweden.
Media information Press releases, photos and/or videos are found here.
 
PARTICIPATING ORGANISATIONS
Funding agency: Swedish National Space Board and DLR, Germany
Launch contractor: SSC
Research organizations:

Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics Dr Markus Rapp
at the University of Rostock
Schlossstr. 6
DE-18225 Kühlungsborn
Germany

University of Oslo Mr. F. Jarle
Department of physics
Fysisk institutt
Postboks 1048 Blindern
0316 Oslo
Norway

Technische Universität München Prof. Dr. U. Walter
Institute of Astronautics
Boltzmannstraße 15
D-85748 Garching
Germany

Universität der Bundeswehr Munich Mr H. Griebel
Werner Heisenberg-Weg 39
855 77 Neubiberg
Germany

The Mars society Germany Mr H. Griebel
c/o Hannes Griebel
Jäger-von-fall str 15A
85662 Hohenbrunn
Germany

European Space Research & Technology Centre Ms.E Celton
Education Department
Fu040
Keplerlaan 1
Postbus 299
2200 AG Noordwijk (The Netherlands)

Department of Space Science
Kiruna Space and Enviroment Campus Mr H. Zangeneh Pour
P.O Box 812
SE-981 28 Kiruna
Sweden

Kiruna Space High school Mr M. Neuhold
P.O Box 5052
SE-981 05 Kiruna
Sweden

Contact persons: Mr. M. Hörschgen, Campaign Manager, German Aerospace Center DLR,
Mr O. Persson, Project manager, SSC Esrange
 
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Launcher: Maxus tower
Rocket motor: Unguided solid propellant single stage Improved Orion rocket, see Rocket motors, (mil. M112 Hawk) from military surplus. The motor is a dual thrust burner with a boost phase of 5 seconds and a sustainer phase of approximately 21 seconds. The rocket accelerates the payload then for 26 seconds with peak acceleration during the boost phase of 21g.

Apogee:

110 km
Payload lenth: 6,4 m
Payload weight: 100 kg


EXPERIMENT MODULES

Module Experiment Investigator
ARCHIMEDES/Regina The goal to built a spacecraft capable of probing the atmosphere of planet Mars from its thin outermost layers down to the surface.

The Mars society Germany Mr H. Griebel
c/o Hannes Griebel
Jäger-von-fall str 15A
85662 Hohenbrunn 
, Universität der Bundeswehr Munich Mr H. Griebel
Werner Heisenberg-Weg 39
855 77 Neubiberg
Germany, University of Stuttgart and others

T-REX

Main focus of the experiment was to find accelerometers that are cheap but still able to survive in space.

Technische Universität München Prof. Dr. U. Walter
Institute of Astronautics
Boltzmannstraße 15
D-85748 Garching
GermanyInstitute of Astronautics
Camera The goal of this experiment is to test the sensors and in particular the optics during supersonic flight and measure the interconnected heating of the hardware.  
TUPEX
TUPEX is an experimental platform to design and test components especially used in pico satellites.

The experiment is operated by the University of Berlin.

IAP Particle detector

Test of 4 detectors

Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the University of Rostock
MEMSIACS
The use of MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) is one step forward towards the miniaturization of electronic systems used in space.

The MEMS experiment is built by a Norwegian team.

University of Oslo Mr. F. Jarle
Department of physics
Fysisk institutt
Postboks 1048 Blindern
0316 Oslo
Norway

 

 

 

REXUS 3 Experiment overview

REGINA
Project ARCHIMEDES is a joint effort of the Mars Society Germany, the University of the German Federal Armed Forces in Munich, the University of Stuttgart and others with the goal to built a spacecraft capable of probing the atmosphere of planet Mars from its thin outermost layers down to the surface. This goal will be achieved by deploying a spherical super-pressure - type balloon prior to atmospheric entry.
The flight on a sounding rocket can close an important gap between previous parabolic flight and orbit, namely by putting the system in space just long enough for the balloon package to be ejected and to start expanding under the pressure of its own protective gas filling. The experiment starts when the payload section of the rocket enters 0-g. It should be mounted at a free end of the payload section, preferably at the opposite end of the recovery system. After entry into the 0-g phase the separation mechanism is triggered, and in a safe distance the deployment mechanism. Cameras that are left in the payload section record the separation and deployment, and can be recovered with the other payload.
Combined mass: Approx. 30kg incl. batteries and structure.

T-REX
The T-Rex project at the Institute of Astronautics started in April 2005 as a part of the practical course “Space Technology”. The task was to develop and construct an experiment that can be placed on the Rexus-Rocket. Soon it was clear that the main focus of the experiment existed in finding accelerometers, which are really cheap but still able to survive in space. Three main requirements where found:
• Measure accelerations as best as possible
• Use low cost elements
• Assure a safe operation

Several acceleration sensor principles have been considered and led to the selection of capacitive accelerometers. In the end, accelerometer choice was mainly based on low cost and thus, summing all up, T-Rex now fly with 3 x 3 Freescale accelerometers. The chosen products are:
• Freescale MMA3201D 2 channels +/- 40g
• Freescale MMA1250D 1 channel +/- 5g
• Freescale MMA6233Q 2 channels +/- 10g

As within these chosen sensors are no three-dimensional units, measuring all three axes will be achieved through appropriate set-up on the circuit boards. Three independent circuit boards will be used, each carrying three different sensors and a complete set of data processing units. The sampling rate is 2 kHz per channel. The data is stored in solid flash devices and will be partially transmitted over downlink for redundancy.
Camera
The goal of this experiment is to test the sensors and in particular the optics during supersonic flight and measure the interconnected heating of the hardware. The Camera Hardware is capable of storing the temperature of the rocket casing. This information is added to the picture data. Because of unpredictable changing illumination ratios during the flight, the camera is recording pictures with cyclical changing exposure times. The picture data will be ordered by different brightness values after the flight and processed for colour matching. Maybe equalization will be also applied. After this process the data will be assembled to an animation.

TUPEX
The experiment is operated by the University of Berlin.
TUPEX is an experimental platform to design and test components especially used in pico satellites. The experiment is operated by the Technical University of Berlin.
The objective is to test the functionality of solar cells, several commercial sensors and a self-developed sun sensor for attitude determination in respect to the sun.

TUPEX consists of a main box and two solar boards. The main box includes a measurement value logging unit and several sensors (3 gyros, 2 two-axis accelerometers, 1 three-axis magnetometer, 5 temperature sensors). The solar boards include a triple junction GaAs solar cell, a sun sensor and a temperature sensor.
During flight all acquired values are stored on flash memory and transmitted to ground station via rocket communication link simultaneously.

IAP Particle detector
The instrument package for the REXUS-sounding rocket campaign at the ESRANGE in April 2006 provided by the Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the University of Rostock consists of a total of 4 instruments: The two simple particle detectors are flat electrode surfaces mounted flash with the rocket payload skin. Strong NeFeBo-magnets (field strength ~0.4 T) are embedded into the electrode structure to prevent electrons and ions from contributing to the measured signal.
The two fixed biased Langmuir sondes have a similar geometry, however, instead of using magnets in order to shield the electrodes from the ambient plasma, the electrode surfaces are biased at +4.5 V (-4.5V) in order to measure electrons (positive ions).

HDD-ERROR
Hard Disc Drive, Rexus Rocket of Rymdgymnasiet
Upper secondary space school, Kiruna
Size: 112x62x31mm
Mass: 162g

The purpose of the experiment is to analyze how a micro hard drive in a modern MP3-player is affected by the environment in space. Is it possible for a hard drive to function after it has been exposed to high acceleration, low gravity and no air pressure?
Material
The micro hard drive MP3-player Iriver H10, sponsored by Iriver Nordic and encouraged by the Swedish tech magazine M3.
Possible interference
The player can maybe expose electromagnetic fields but it will be reduced by the protective box, the box shields frequencies from 5 Hz up to 1800 MHz.
Analyzing
The player will be examined prior to launch that it functions correctly. An error check will be done on the hard drive using the error check tool in Windows for hard drives. Hard drive info will also be obtained from another application not yet decided, probably Partition Magic.
During the flight the built in FM radio will provide static noise to be recorded on the hard disc.
The examinations after the trip to space will be first of all controlling if the player starts and can play the recorded noise. After that an error check will be performed in Windows followed by a more detailed scan by a proper application, probably Partition Magic. In any case if the player starts or does not start, I will through eventual sponsorship agreements try to send the player to computer laboratories or technical universities for further technically advanced examinations, if needed.

MEMSIACS
The MEMS experiment, built by a Norwegian team.
The use of MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) is one step forward towards the miniaturization of electronic systems used in space. Angular rate sensors and accelerometers based on different MEMS technologies are today available from several companies. We will focus on sensors from SensoNor, Analog Devices and MEMSIC which are all using different sensing technologies. These sensing technologies are based on vibrating silicon structure (gyro), capacitive comb structure (accelerometer) and natural heat convection (accelerometer) respectively.

MEMSIC accelerometers do not depend on moving mechanical parts. The principle of operation of the accelerometers is based on heat transfer by natural convection, and they measure internal changes in heat transfer caused by acceleration. This new technology provides shock survival up to 50.000g and eliminates stiction and particle failures that commonly exist in all traditional capacitive sensors.

The SensoNor SAR10 angular rate gyro is a silicon bulk micromachined capacitive device, consisting of a vibrating silicon structure sensor element and an ASIC integrated in a SOIC package. The principal of operation of the sensor is based on the detection of Coriolis force. Excellent gyroscopic scale factor, offset and vibration sensitivity is achieved due to anti phase operation.
The Analog Devices accelerometers are a well proven capacitive technology and are frequently used nowadays.
To achieve the most accurate measurements possible, these sensors will be placed at different angles and positions inside the payload. Several of the sensors will be running in parallel during the flight so a direct comparison of the different sensor outputs should be easily achievable. A number of microcontrollers will collect all the information from the sensors and direct it to the encoder unit.
The primary objective of the experiment is to investigate our sensors behavior in the harsh environment of the interior of a sounding rocket. The goal is to determine if they are good enough to be considered for future space applications. Different sensors are set up to measure the spin and coning of the rocket, acceleration in the longitudinal direction and the vibration subjected to the circuit box. If the experiment proves successful, these sensors can make up a measurement system witch can be used to evaluate the behavior of the rocket during its flight

 

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REXUS 2

REXUS

Campaign information Rexus 2 (2004)

GENERAL INFORMATION

Launch site: Esrange Space Center
Launch date: October 28 at 21:53 LT, 2004
Customer: The REXUS program is a joint project between the Swedish Space Corporation SSC, ESRANGE, and the Mobile Rocket Base (Moraba) of the German Aerospace Center DLR, conducted by newly founded EUROLAUNCH. The scientific payload capacity is shared between Swedish and German student experimenters. REXUS is considered as an annual sounding rocket program, launched from ESRANGE, Sweden.
Media information Press releases, photos and/or videos are found here.
 
PARTICIPATING ORGANISATIONS
Funding agency: Swedish National Space Board and DLR, Germany
Launch contractor: SSC
Research organizations:

IRV - Institutionen för rymdvetenskap, Kiruna
LTU - Luleå tekniska universitet
SSC - Swedish Space Corporation, Esrange
DLR - Deutsches Zentrum fűr Luft- und Raumfahrt

Contact persons: Mr. M. Hörschgen, Campaign Manager, German Aerospace Center DLR,
Mr O. Persson, Project manager, SSC Esrange
 
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Launcher: Maxus tower
Rocket motor: Unguided solid propellant single stage Improved Orion rocket, see Rocket motors, (mil. M112 Hawk) from military surplus. The motor is a dual thrust burner with a boost phase of 5 seconds and a sustainer phase of approximately 21 seconds. The rocket accelerates the payload then for 26 seconds with peak acceleration during the boost phase of 21g.

Apogee:

91,4 km
Payload lenth: 6,4 m
Payload weight: 100 kg


EXPERIMENT MODULES

 

Module Experiment Developed by Investigator
 

A sounding rocket carrying a total of 7 instruments dedicated to the measurement of ionized consituents in the mesosphere

On board the rocket was a new ECOMA-particle detector which combines a Xenon-flashlamp with a very sensitive electrometer for the measurement of meteoric dust particles. Then there were two simpler particle detectors and two skin-type fixed biased Langmuir-probes for measuring electrons and positive ions.

 

IRV - Institutionen för rymdvetenskap, Kiruna
LTU - Luleå tekniska universitet
SSC - Swedish Space Corporation, Esrange
DLR - Deutsches Zentrum fűr Luft- und Raumfahrt.

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